A Cost-Effective Solution to Combined Shear and Uplift Winds

Homes built in high-wind areas must be able to withstand the wind forces known as uplift (which try to roll the structure over) and shear (which tries to push the structure sideways). Catastrophic damage to property and tragic loss of life have prompted industry professionals to look for cost-effective ways to build homes better able to withstand combined shear and uplift using products trades are familiar with. Now structural wall sheathing can provide the required continuous load path needed to resist high winds and meet high wind codes.

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How to Choose the Right Nails Part 1

Nails literally hold the world together, but just how much do you know about your fasteners? Do you use the same nails for every job out of habit? Always ask your design professional to stipulate sizes and fastener patterns, but knowing what kind of nails to use may save you time and money on work that lasts.

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8 Strategies for Better Energy Efficiency in a Retrofit or Addition Part 1

Homes built as recently as the 1980s are riddled with gaps in the building envelope and have far too little insulation to measure up to modern energy efficiency standards. Retrofitting an old home will make it more comfortable, will reduce energy costs and will make it kinder on the environment. The question is; where do you get the most bang for your retrofitting buck? Here is a basic guide to help you to decide where your money is best spent.

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Air-Sealing for Effective Building Envelopes

An effective building envelope is a combination of insulating building materials and a reduction in air leakage. This reduction can be achieved by using taller wall sheathing panels and through effectively sealing air leaks. When determining which air leaks construction professionals should focus on, Dave Wolf from Owens Corning Science and Technology has conducted a study to see which leaks require the least effort and sealant and provide the highest returns in building envelope efficiency.

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